Posted by: senjmito | September 19, 2010

Wellington Mayoral candidates respond to our transport questionnaire

Wellington Mayoral Candidates

Kerry Prendergast

1. What proportion of the transport funding in the Long Term Council Community Plan (LTCCP) of the Council you are standing for would you want to see devoted to:

Please explain these choices.

a. Public transport?

Currently about 0.11% Opex, 2.66% Capex but other spending enforcing parking and clearways of $10m etc helps these areas. I support this level of spending but it will need to increase over the next few years to improve pedestrians, cycling, PT. Note: GWRC and Government pay for PT, and the current subsidy is $70m per year of which WCC ratepayers pay half.

b. Walking (facilities and promotion)?.27%    1.89
c. Cycling (facilities and promotion)?.02%    0.42
2. Do you support the following transport projects, where applicable:
Note: Options a-c are mutually exclusive. Each assumes that essential service vehicles would have limited access.

a. Turning the Golden Mile into a public transport corridor Y/N no,
b. Turning the Golden Mile into a pedestrian corridor Y/N no,

c. Turning the Golden Mile into a dedicated public transport/pedestrian space Y/N yes with access to taxis and service vehicles
d. Extending the rail system through the Wellington CBD, by developing modern trams as a priority for the short term Y/N no
e. A Basin Reserve flyover Y/N no
f. Doubling the Terrace Tunnel Y/N yes, in the long term
g. Doubling the Mt Victoria Tunnel Y/N yes, required to provide capacity for HOV lane to support a rapid transit system to the airport
h. The Kapiti Expressway Y/N yes

3. Do you support the creation of an integrated public transport system across the region? If so, what changes would you propose making to bring this about?

Yes. Integrated ticketing critical- GWRC should move faster on this. Real time information. Reliability of service

4. What do you consider should be the top transport priorities of the Council for which you are standing?

1. create dedicated HOV lanes Railway Station to Hospital and Airport:

2. complete feasibility study GWRC, WCC, NZTA, due 2013 on light rail:

3. agree options Basin/Buckle/Mt Vic tunnel doubling and road widening Ruahine etc:

4. improve HOV lanes Hutt Rd, Kent/Cambridge, Adelaide Rd, plus 3. above:

5. improve cycle and walk ways as part of Syntec study.

5. What are your own top transport priorities for the region?

1. Sort out congestion airport to Kapiti:

2. improve reliability of Public Transport:

3. dedicated HOV Railway to Airport and Hospital:

4. more cycle ways.

Celia Wade-Brown

1. What proportion of the transport funding in the Long Term Council Community Plan (LTCCP) of the Council you are standing for would you want to see devoted to:

a. Public transport?

b. Walking (facilities and promotion)?

c. Cycling (facilities and promotion)?

Please explain these choices.

Transport is always a defining issue in Wellington. We all want to get places without more traffic jams, stress and pollution. To do this we need to re-think the logic of building more roads and promoting the use of single-passenger vehicles, so my vision for transport in Wellington is a transformative, strategic investment in our future, not simply incremental upgrades to our existing infrastructure.

If I’m elected mayor, I intend to construct a world-class light rail system for Wellington. The new light rail line will run from the railway station to Courtenay Place via the Golden Mile, onwards to the hospital and Newtown, through Kilbirnie to the airport. I intend to complete the planning in my first term as mayor, to begin laying rails in my second term, and to see the system complete by 2020.

For this reason, the public transport component of the LTCCP budget will have to be increased significantly and a new balance achieved between different transport modes. Cycling, taxis, emergency vehicles, delivery vehicles and buses all use roads as well as private cars. Under my leadership, roads will continue to be properly maintained – after all, as regional rail experiences have taught us, cutting maintenance to the bone is a false economy – but light rail will be the focus of investment rather than new roads. This investment should be made by central government along this key corridor. I note that the N2A study says “Priority will be given to passenger transport through this corridor particularly during the peak period” yet bus lanes along Kent/Cambridge and Riddiford Street are not being consulted on yet.

I will continue to lead key initiatives such as the Great Harbour Way and   promotional activity around cycling and walking, with targeted initiatives (such as traffic light sequencing, signage of the walking routes through parks and city streets, and lower speeds in narrow streets and along the coast) that can be made at modest cost to ensure the city is easier to get around healthily.

2. Do you support the following transport projects, where applicable:

Note: Options a-c are mutually exclusive. Each assumes that essential service vehicles would have limited access.

a. Turning the Golden Mile into a public transport corridor Y/N

b. Turning the Golden Mile into a pedestrian corridor Y/N

c. Turning the Golden Mile into a dedicated public transport/pedestrian space Y + bikes

d. Extending the rail system through the Wellington CBD, by developing modern trams as a priority for the short term Y

e. A Basin Reserve flyover N

f. Doubling the Terrace Tunnel N

g. Doubling the Mt Victoria Tunnel N

h. The Kapiti Expressway probably not but don’t have local knowledge

As noted above, I am passionate about seeing light rail in Wellington by 2020 (option d). For this reason I’m keen to see Lambton Quay developed as a dedicated public transport/pedestrian space (option c) to both streamline the light rail network and improve the quality of living, working and shopping in the Golden Mile. I would modify this choice to add cycling to the length of the Golden Mile. At 30k, there should be able to be coexistence. Given this will be the key transport investment for Wellington in the coming decade, I am opposed to spending money on a Basin Reserve flyover, an additional Terrace Tunnel or a second Mt Victoria tunnel – albeit that the Basin Reserve will need some investment to ensure light rail can be threaded around the sports ground in an effective and sensitive way. Bus lanes and bus priority lights could be installed at the Basin almost immediately. And I think I’m not really qualified to speak about the Kapiti Expressway, other than to note that I support the desire of the community to make their own transport and roading decisions, rather than to have them forced on them by the NZ Transport Agency.

3. Do you support the creation of an integrated public transport system across the region? If so, what changes would you propose making to bring this about?

Integrating the public transport systems in Wellington is an important step; having one ticket (or card) to carry people from one end of the region to the other has obvious efficiency benefits, as well as removing one more obstacle to people using public transport. So I’m keen to see integrated schedules, integrated ticketing and a more strategic approach to planning and delivering public transport for the region.

Having said that, there are lots of moving parts to Wellington’s transport. We need to see effective coordination across a number of local authorities, central government agencies and private sector operators, and as mayor of Wellington it will be my role to bring all the stakeholders together in a constructive. After all, the only way we’re going to see light rail in Wellington by 2020 is through cooperation across those same agencies and companies, and I’m clear that it will be my role to lead public engagement, steer the process through the Regional Land Transport Committee and other forums, convene the discussions, drive the agenda and negotiate a high-quality outcome that works for all the participants.

Integrating public transport with walking and cycling is essential for access and mobility. Maps and signs online and at each bus stop could be useful. Bus carriage could start with the route to Makara Peak at the weekends.

Online journey planning should also be integrated instead of the separate public transport, driving, walking and cycling provision now.

4. What do you consider should be the top transport priorities of the Council for which you are standing?

1. Light rail from the railway station to the airport by 2020.

2. Transit oriented development e.g apartments over a refurbished Johnsonville station

3. Strategic cycle routes – most urgent are Great Harbour Way from Wellington Waterfront to Petone, Middleton Road and the Tawa-Porirua connection.

4. Lower speeds and more pedestrian priority in the city and suburban centres.

5. Rental bikes ready for RWC2011 visitors.

6. Safe Routes to Schools expanded – for road safety, independence, health and reduction of congestion – think how there is less congestion in school holidays.

We can have a more attractive city for walking and cycling around – and gain benefits to our quality of life and economic prospects.

5. What are your own top transport priorities for the region?

Well integrated public transport so the train lines from Kapiti, Poriria, Hutt and Wairarapa link through to Wellington south of the railway station.

Development of the Wellington to Martinborough cycle way connecting the Great Harbour Way, Hutt River Trail, the Rimutaka Incline Rail Trail and a safe route from Cross Creek to Martinborough. Developing the route round the Wairarapa coast from Pencarrow to Ocean Beach would be a close second.

Investment in road crash blackspots so when a car is the most appropriate mode fro a journey, the driver and passengers can expect to arrive safely.

Jack Yan

1. What proportion of the transport funding in the Long Term Council Community Plan (LTCCP) of the Council you are standing for would you want to see devoted to:
a. Public transport?
15 per cent
b. Walking (facilities and promotion)? 18 per cent
c. Cycling (facilities and promotion)? 3 per cent
Please explain these choices.

Walking and cycling have been calculated from the recreation budget in some earlier LTCCPs. However, I am happy to see their proportion of the transportation budget increase, since active commuting sees to a lowering of mortality rates and increased fitness. I am also an advocate of pedestrianizing more of the inner city, and have been since I announced my campaign in September 2009.

The remainder of the transport budget would be used for road safety, control and management, the vehicle network. The increase in the above three will, logically, be taken from a mixture of the road safety and vehicle network proportions while maintaining their overall integrity.

2. Do you support the following transport projects, where applicable:
Note: Options a-c are mutually exclusive. Each assumes that essential service vehicles would have limited access.

a. Turning the Golden Mile into a public transport corridor Y/N
b. Turning the Golden Mile into a pedestrian corridor Y/N
c. Turning the Golden Mile into a dedicated public transport/pedestrian space Y/N
* With conditions. Evaluation would be done during the first carless day in Wellington in summer 2011, with further studies during carless days that I would advocate for during the World Cup. If successful, then this could be made permanent.
d. Extending the rail system through the Wellington CBD, by developing modern trams as a priority for the short term Y/N
e. A Basin Reserve flyover Y/N
f. Doubling the Terrace Tunnel Y/N
g. Doubling the Mt Victoria Tunnel Y/N
h. The Kapiti Expressway Y/N

3. Do you support the creation of an integrated public transport system across the region? If so, what changes would you propose making to bring this about?

Absolutely. (a) Appoint a council representative to the bus and train companies with a view of coordinating routes (à la Singapore). (b) Make bus and train information available publicly via the internet and on to hand-held devices. (c) Negotiate the use of Snapper or a similar system (à la Octopus card in Hong Kong) for use on all public transport services in Wellington. (d) Fully transparent council, including making council meetings public. There is no reason the public should not have a say in their city via these channels.

4. What do you consider should be the top transport priorities of the Council for which you are standing?

Long-term, Wellington needs to work with central government on the regional plan. This is beyond the WRC. At my meetings with the MED, there are some long-term solutions for our airport that my opponents have not even discussed, which will affect investment into transportation in 2020–30. We can’t ignore these, and Council needs to begin examining them. It surprises me that so many of my opponents’ policies seem to ignore some of the realities in our national vision—and yet I am the non-politician in this race!

5. What are your own top transport priorities for the region?

Right now, my main priority is to get 3 (a) above running—getting a city rep on to the bus and train companies here in Wellington and have them properly coordinated. This will solve many of our immediate problems, answering a very simple question: ‘When I get off the train, why is a bus not waiting?’

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Responses

  1. […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Jimw, tonitanaforpcc and SEF, Tim Jones. Tim Jones said: RT @sustwelltrans: Wellington Mayoral candidates on transport issues: http://bit.ly/aLpeqc – Council candidates: http://bit.ly/adUe2L […]

  2. […] Wellington Mayoral candidates […]

  3. We denounce this questionairre as only 2 of the 6 Mayoral Candidates were asked to participate which in this day and age is un-democratic and therefore has no value to the voters of Wellington and should be treated as such.

  4. All candidates who supplied their email address to the returning officer were asked to participate. Three Wellington mayoral candidates responded – Kerry Prendergast, Celia Wade-Brown and Jack Yan.

  5. Thank you, I have relayed your comment to the 3 candidates and they will answer you in due time with a democratic response.

  6. […] that the flyover is unpopular? On a transport website there’s a one-word indication that she may have reversed her opinion. Not that this means the flyover threat has […]


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